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Neighborhoods M-Z view neighborhoods A-L

North End

The North End is one of Boston's oldest neighborhoods and was settled first by Irish, Jewish and Italian immigrants, in that order. It is now commonly known as the "Little Italy" of Boston. Espresso bars, pastry shops, small retail stores, old-fashioned grocery stores, and Italian restaurants are housed in 100-year-old brick buildings, giving the North End its old world flavor. In the summer, weekend festivals line the streets in honor of different patron saints. The North End is home to many historic sites, such as Paul Revere's house, the Old North Church, and the Copp's Hill Burial Ground. The completion of the Big Dig is transforming this area with the demolition of the Central Artery, providing a space for the Rose Kennedy Greenway and re-linking the North End with its adjacent neighborhoods.

Settled: 1630
Area: ½ square mile
Population: 12,000
Tax rate: $11.12 per $1000
Library: North End Branch Library
Public schools: Eliot Elementary School; View a list of public schools at the Boston Public Schools website
Transportation: Green Line
Cultural/recreational: Old North Church, Paul Revere Mall, Paul Revere House, Copp's Hill Burial Ground, Bank of America Center for sporting events and concerts, summer festivals in honor of patron saints.

LINKS

Neighbhorhood Guide

Old North Church

Official Big Dig Website

Rose Kennedy Greenway

South Boston

South Boston is a peninsula annexed to Boston in 1804. Many Irish-Americans settled here originally and the area has become very diverse in the past ten years. The community was organized in a grid of numbered and lettered streets. In the years leading up to the Civil War, South Boston was a center of industry, including iron foundries,, shipyards, refineries and machine shops. Shipyard and railroad jobs provided work for South Boston residents, many of whom came from Ireland. South Boston consists of miles of beaches and waterfront parks, including Carson, L Street and Pleasure Bay Beaches. In the late 19th century, Frederick Law Olmsted created "the Strandway," which runs from Castle Island to Columbus Park. South Boston housing ranges from triple deckers to single family homes to new construction lofts.

Settled: 1804
Area: 3.13 sq. miles
Population: 30,000 residents
Tax rate: $11.12 per $1000
Library: South Boston Branch Library
Schools: four public elementary, one middle, one senior high; five Catholic elementary. View a list of public schools at the Boston Public Schools website
Transportation: Buses, Red Line
Cultural/recreational: L St. Bathhouse, Castle Island, Columbus Park, two miles of public waterfront, Little League, basketball leagues, South Boston Youth Hockey League, South Boston Pop Warner football league, Boys and Girls Club, South Boston Neighborhood House.

LINKS

South Boston neighborhood guides:
http://www.southbostononline.com/
http://64.226.34.179/

South Boston recreation sites

Bank of America Pavilion for concerts

Mission Hill

Mission Hill, originally an area with many farms and breweries, is an architectural landmark district with a combination of freestanding houses, traditional brick rowhouses and "triple deckers." The area is comprised of students, medical staff and students at the nearby Longwood Medical area. Mission Hill offers a beautiful skyline view of Boston from many of its historic homes.

Settled: 1630; annexed to Boston in 1868
Area: 0.75 square mile
Population: 15,700
Tax rate: $11.12 per $1000
Library: Parker Hill Branch Library
Public schools: (Public) Mission Hill School (K-8), Maurice J. Tobin School (K-8), New Mission High School; (private) Mission Church Grammar School View a list of public schools at the Boston Public Schools website
Transportation: Green Line
Cultural/recreational: Playgrounds, Mission Hill Little League, Olmsted Park, Mission Hill Triangle Architectural Conservation District

LINKS

Mission Hill Gazette

Great neighborhood guide

Mission Hill Neighborhood Housing Services

Seaport District

The Seaport District is located a short walk from the Financial District and only minutes to South Boston. This area is home to Boston's maritime industrial center and has had several major projects completed or in the works, including the new Boston Convention Center and the Fan Pier, which includes plans for office space, retail, condominiums, hotels and a new site for Boston's Institute of Contemporary Art. Originally a tidal marsh, this area was created by landfill in the late 1800's. The brick warehouses once manufactured or housed iron, glass. brick, machinery, wagons, soap, elevators and beer. In recent years, many old warehouses have been converted to loft condominiums and new buildings have been built from the ground up. Today the neighborhood is home to the largest concentration of visual artists in New England. In addition, the area has diversified with recent condominium conversions and new construction.

Settled: Late 1800's
Area: N/A
Population: N/A
Tax rate: $11.12 per $1000
Library: South Boston Branch Library
Public schools: View a list of public schools at the Boston Public Schools website
Transportation: MBTA
Cultural/recreational: Fort Point Open Studios; Mobius (see links);

LINKS

Fort Point Channel Arts Community

Fort Point Neighborhood Alliance

Neighborhood Information

Boston Children's Museum

Boston Artist-run Center for experimental work in all media

Official Big Dig Website

Rose Kennedy Greenway

West End

Originally settled by Jewish, Italian and Polish immigrants, the neighborhood buildings of the West End were destroyed and replaced with high-rises as part of "Urban Renewal" in the 1960's. The West End is comprised of many residents from all over the world, and medical professionals who work at the adjacent Massachusetts General Hospital. The neighborhood buildings include full-service high-rise condominiums and rental apartments and one cooperative building. The location is adjacent to City Hall and Beacon Hill and within walking distance of the Financial District, North End and Waterfront areas. The recent removal of elevated train tracks has changed the look and feel of this area, shedding new light on historic buildings once concealed.

Settled: mid 18th century
Area: 1/3rd a square mile
Population: 4,600
Tax rate: $11.12 per $1000
Library: West End Branch Library
Schools: View a list of public schools at the Boston Public Schools website
Transportation: Green Line, Red Line
Cultural/recreational: Various private athletic facilities, museums, historical sites, other, TD Banknorth Garden

LINKS

History of Scollay Square/West End

TD Banknorth Garden, for sporting events and concerts

Midtown

The Midtown/Boston Common area is centrally located within walking distance of all downtown neighborhoods. This area has been revitalized in the past five years with the construction of many new hotels and residences, such as the Ritz Carlton and Grandview, in addition to the renovation of the Opera House and new Loews Cinema. Many new boutique hotels, restaurants and lounges have made this area a popular destination. Bustling during the day with office workers and a popular destination at night due to its proximity with the Theater District, Midtown offers the best of everything and offers the shortest daily commute for those working in the Financial District. Downtown Crossing offers a bustling area with department stores, jewelers and specialty stores.

Settled: 17th century
Area: N/A
Population: N/A
Tax rate: $11.12 per $1000
Library: Boston Public Library
Public schools: View a list of public schools at the Boston Public Schools website
Transportation: Park Street & Downtown Crossing Stations; Silver Line
Cultural/recreational: Opera House, Theatre District, Boston Common, Ritz Carlton Hotel, Sports Club LA, Orpheum Theater; Freedom Trail; Old South Meeting House; Old State House

LINKS

Downtown Crossing Neighhborhood Guide

Freedom Trail

Opera House

Wang Center

Broadway in Boston

South End

The South End is one of the most diverse neighborhoods in the Boston Central area. It covers a vast area which runs from Massachusetts Avenue all the way to Chinatown.

Its main thoroughfares such as Columbus Avenue and Tremont Street are intersected by lovely little tree lined side streets with charming red brick row houses.

The South End was originally one of the most fashionable neighborhoods in Boston and is an extension of Back Bay Proper. It is the largest Victorian neighborhood in the country.

The streets of Lower South End such as Arlington, Berkeley, Clarendon, and Dartmouth run all the way from the Charles River in Back Bay, connecting the two inner-city neighborhoods.

With the demographic changes that took place in the mid-century, which saw many inner-city residents moving to the suburbs, the South End became an area of known for its rooming houses and transient population.

In the last three decades, however, this unique part of the city has undergone a renaissance marked by innovative and upscale architectural restoration. Some of the most striking examples of contemporary renovations, within the structures of existing brownstones, as well as the newest Loft buildings and renovated warehouse Lofts can be found here.

Today, the South End is home to families and single working professionals alike. There is also a large number of residents with artistic backgrounds because the South End is also home to the Boston Center for the Arts and the Boston Ballet headquarters. In addition, the South End is known for its numerous excellent restaurants, which range from the most trendy gourmet spots to smaller more intimate bistros.

Ultimately, it is the combination of the people, the architecture, and the urban lifestyle that makes the South End, truly one of the most vibrant and exciting neighborhoods in the city.

Settled: 1804
Area: 3.75 sq. miles
Population: 31,000+ residents
Tax rate: $11.12 per $1000
Library: South End Branch Library
Schools: four public elementary, one middle, one senior high; five Catholic elementary. View a list of public schools at the Boston Public Schools website
Transportation: Orange Line, Silver Line
Cultural/recreational: Boston Center for the Arts, Boston Ballet, Open Studios, Rough and Tumble Theater, Speakeasy Stage Company, Sugan Theater Company, Theater Offensive, Lyric Stage, Wally's Café (jazz bar).

LINKS

South End neighborhood association

South End neighborhood site

Boston Center for the Arts

Boston Ballet

New Calderwood Pavilion

Waterfront

Historically, Boston's Waterfront area has always been in a constant state of change. Even today, Boston's Big Dig is nearing completion and will add many beautiful parks where the Central Artery once divided it from the rest of the city. The smell of sea permeates the air and sailboats, barges and ships dot Boston Harbor. Building types include converted wharf buildings, brick rowhouses, lofts and full-service high-rises. The area is adjacent to the North End and walking distance to the Financial District, Government Center, Fanuiel Hall, and many fine restaurants, sporting events, concert venues and cultural institutions.

Settled: 1630
Area: N/A
Population: N/A

Tax rate: : $11.12 per $1000
Library: North End Branch Library
Public schools: View a list of public schools at the Boston Public Schools website
Transportation: Water Taxis, MBTA
Cultural/recreational: Christopher Columbus Waterfront Park; New England Aquarium; Whale watches; Harbor cruises; U.S.S. Constitution; Boston Sailing Center

LINKS

Official Big Dig Website

Rose Kennedy Greenway

The Boston Harbor Association

The Boston Harbor Walk